The English Revolution and the Genesis of Modernity

by E. John Winner ____ This is first of two essays, concerning the events of the English Revolution of the 17th century.  Why should these events concern an audience primarily interested in philosophy and philosophy’s concrete relations with contemporary culture and politics?  The immediate answer to this is quite easily pronounced in two names: Hobbes and Locke.  We should all […]

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Inventing Religion

by Mark English Nouns and adjectives like ‘religion’ and ‘religious’ can be seen as more or less useful classificatory terms. More – or less – useful, as I say. The standard view is that there are various sets of practices (customs and rituals) and grand narratives and beliefs (concerning spiritual or magical beings and powers) to which different human groups […]

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Course Notes – Immanuel Kant, “What is Enlightenment?”

by Daniel A. Kaufman https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/documents/What_is_Enlightenment.pdf Another semester at Missouri State and another edition of Course Notes.  Up for consideration this time is Immanuel Kant’s “An Answer to the Question: ‘What is Enlightenment?’ ” Having taught Introduction to Philosophy from a topical perspective for a substantial period of time, in recent years I have been teaching the course historically, with a […]

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The Ripeness is All: Hamlet and the Problem of Uncertainty

E. John Winner Although the Italian Renaissance produced important works prefatory to the arrival of Modernity, three texts actually announce it.  Surprisingly, given modern biases, none of them are works of science or philosophy.  Instead, they are literary fictions, and notably, each had a profound effect on the very structures of the languages in which they were written.  In Don […]

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