Tag: education

  • “Good Practices”

    by Daniel A. Kaufman ____ I am mostly out of the philosophy profession and have been for several years now, so but for Justin Weinberg and his Daily Nous, I would be unaware of the vital goings-on of professional philosophy’s Bright Young Things and their fellow travelers. I would have never have known, for example,…

  • Toleration

    by Kevin Currie-Knight ____ Suppose that you live next door to someone and think something about the way they live – their religion, their domestic arrangements, their politics, even their race – is wrong or objectionable. If you are a particularly grousy or dogmatic neighbor, you might take every occasion to let them know how…

  • Philosophy (of Education): What’s the Point?

    by Kevin Currie-Knight ____ The following piece is a reflection I wrote mainly in response to undergraduate questions about philosophy’s purpose and value. I teach philosophy-of-education themed (and other) classes in a College of Education, so most of my students are neither philosophy majors nor in any way fluent with philosophy coming into my course.…

  • Open Letter Concerning Academic Freedom

    by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ Alex Byrne has brought it to my attention that my Open Letter defending Kathleen Stock and academic freedom in the University, with its sizeable roster of remarkable signatories, is no longer available at Google Sites, where it was originally posted, in January 2021. I originally composed the letter with the…

  • The Interdependence of Activists and Skeptics

    by Kevin Currie-Knight ____ It started as a casual conversation between myself and a colleague, but quickly went in a heated and interesting direction. She and I were talking about our teaching, and I mentioned some class readings and discussions my sections were doing on a particular issue that my colleague and I both care…

  • Sources of Human Diversity

    by Kevin Currie-Knight ___ People differ in all sorts of ways. Most of our differences generally go unnoticed when we interact. For example, with regard to a store clerk yesterday, I didn’t notice what her eye color or dominant hand is. But other differences, as the saying goes, make a difference. Historically and into the…

  • Why We Do History

    by Kevin Curry-Knight ___ Recently, a friend of mine – a Nietzsche scholar – posted on social media that he wished all of those engaged in arguments over antiracism in history education would read Nietzsche’s essay “On the Advantage and Disadvantage of History for Life.” The friend didn’t elaborate, but I respect his judgment and…

  • The Grade Economy

    by Robert Gressis and Kevin Currie-Knight ____ Robert Gressis and Kevin Currie-Knight have a wide-ranging conversation about the (fraught?) relationship between schooling, learning, and A-F grading. The discussion centers around an essay Currie-Knight wrote called Against the Grade Economy: https://theelectricagora.com/2020/12/26/against-the-grade-economy/ Streaming Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK-zUSFJ4Uc&list=PLFBaXJ7yNOYHdqzsJXrJD0aoiCD9H4iJS&index=2&t=16s&ab_channel=ElectricAgora 00:02:36​​ Rob and Kevin make small talk 00:07:01​​ Kevin describes and laments…

  • Against the Grade Economy

    by Kevin Currie-Knight ___ I am a college professor. By and large, I love my job. I love being in the classroom interacting with students. I love the research process. Sometimes, I don’t even mind serving on university committees. But there is one part of my job that I dislike more and more each semester.…

  • On Some Common Rationales for Liberal Education (and why they aren’t very good)

    By Daniel A. Kaufman With the exception, perhaps, of those who teach at our most elite universities and liberal arts colleges, it should be apparent to everyone in the higher education business that the humanities and liberal arts are in trouble.  Deteriorating numbers and declining esteem tell the story of subjects that are increasingly perceived…