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Science and Disenchantment

by Mark English At the age of seven, I went with my mother, brother and baby sister on a long plane journey. We flew for many hours, landing once for refueling (late at night). It was a rough journey, and I recall a certain amount of nausea and vomiting, but the positives certainly outweighed the negatives as far as I […]

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Hitler’s Rant: The Efficacy of a Modern Rhetoric

by E. John Winner With Mein Kampf in the news recently, we’ll here consider two rhetorical strategies found in Hitler’s text.  The first targets the well-known anxieties of Hitler’s expected audience.  The second finds Hitler identifying with his audience or rather, a particular segment of that audience, the young and rebellious.  Hopefully, the reading will reveal something about the people […]

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Brief Hiatus

Dear readers, Unfortunately we will be light on publications this week. Dan Tippens and Dan Kaufman are both constrained for time as the latter is currently traveling, and the former is attending to graduate school application requirements. We will resume our ordinary publication schedule starting next week. -Dan Tippens and Dan Kaufman

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Please Welcome Our New Editor!

Dear Electric Agora community, Please welcome Margaret Huang to our editorial team! Margaret graduated Summa Cum Laude from NYU with a B.A. in Psychology and Philosophy. She will be attending Harvard Law School starting in the fall of 2016. Margaret’s more relevant interests include metaethics, logic, modal logic, philosophy of mind, and law, kayaking, and singing. One of Margaret’s less […]

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What Ails Our Discourse? Part Two

By David Ottlinger In my last essay, I made use of Glenn Loury’s work in exploring possible explanations for our polarized and partisan discourse. [1] I suggested that his work might help explain how society divides into distinct communities of discourse, each exhibiting a natural tendency to suppress their moderates, such that only the most uncompromising tend to remain. I […]

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Excessive Reason

by Daniel A. Kaufman The mainline, analytic philosophical tradition is characterized by a programmatic rationalism that stands upon surprisingly flimsy grounds and is ultimately motivated by an obsession with autonomy and control.  (1) My aim, here, is to make the case for this, as carefully – and as accessibly – as I can.  I have written elsewhere on alternatives, describing […]

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What Ails our Discourse?

By David Ottlinger Only recently, I was on a long drive through the Midwest visiting family over the holidays. Driving through the Midwest, of course, means driving through hundreds of miles of cornfields until the grinding sameness wears you down. Then you have to stop at a fast food chain or, if you are lucky, a Starbucks. And so, feeling […]

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On What There Is (or Isn’t)

By Mark English Trying to write something recently on the nature of logic, I got sidetracked by some ontological issues. Given that logic is about what follows from what and ontology is about what there is, it may not be immediately obvious that the topics are interconnected. They are (to a point). But the two subjects are rather unequal because, […]

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Provocations

By Daniel A. Kaufman With Spring Break rapidly approaching, I asked my students what their plans were, after telling them that my wife, daughter, and I are going to Miami Beach. Apparently, there are no traditional Spring-Breakers among my students this year, though a number of them are going on “mission trips,” with their churches.  What these typically involve is […]

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