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Time for a Change?

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ Over at Leiter Reports, probably the most well-read philosophy-insider’s blog, Brian Leiter has run a two-day poll, in which he asked the following question: Would you leave the APA [American Philosophical Association] and join a new dues-charging professional philosophy association that does much of what the APA does, but without the current political agendas/projects? The […]

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Shakshuka, Mental States, and Iron Maiden

by Daniel A. Kaufman The flagship feminist philosophy journal, Hypatia, still reeling from the scandal involving its treatment of Rebecca Tuvel, finds itself humiliated once again, this time by a Sokal-style hoax. http://leiterreports.typepad.com/blog/2018/10/sokal-hoax-redux.html For those who need a refresher on the Tuvel affair: http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/05/transracialism-article-controversy.html Rare, amazing footage of Iron Maiden from their New Wave of British Heavy Metal days.  (The […]

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Experiencing Nature, Naturally Experienced

by E. John Winner 1. John Dewey was one of America’s most important philosophers.  He’ll be better remembered in the future than he is today.  With philosophers on both sides of the Atlantic fascinated with the ambiguities of language and otherwise unsure of what they are expected to explain – is that science or ethics or good taste? –  Dewey’s […]

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America and the Enlightenment Philosophers

by Bharath Vallabha Context is a funny thing. In an academic context – of philosophy courses and institutional structures – for a long time, my gut reaction to the great Enlightenment thinkers like Locke, Hume and Kant used to be: “Oh, not just more of this again. Their views, marred by racism, exhibit a false sense of universalism, and we […]

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Just Stop It

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ To my fellow professional academics (and especially philosophers): Just stop it, ok?  Stop it! What am I talking about?  Our current penchant for attacking our colleagues personally and professionally, when they disagree with us on moral and political subjects that we care strongly about; our pursuing such attacks so as to silence these colleagues, rather […]

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More on Russell and Lawrence

by Mark English In his autobiography, Bertrand Russell wrote of the “devastating effect” certain criticisms which D.H. Lawrence once made of his social and political views had on him. These events occurred in 1915. “I was inclined to believe that he had some insight denied to me,” Russell wrote, “and when he said that my pacifism was rooted in blood-lust […]

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Bring Back the Slide Rule

by C.J. Uberroth ___ In teaching high school mathematics for the last seven years, I’ve begun to realize that there are some issues in our field that seem ubiquitous. The first is the death of estimation. Students faced with a simple arithmetic problem will sooner jump to their phone for the answer than think about what answer they should obtain. […]

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