Is the Free Will Debate a Verbal Dispute?

By Paul So I’ve noticed that academic philosophers, being fairly insulated from the wider public, have largely failed to engage educated laymen who are interested, and perplexed, about free will. In particular, most people think that there are really only two plausible positions — if determinism is true then there is no free will, and if determinism is not true […]

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Donald Trump and Enoch Powell

by Mark English Contributors to The Electric Agora have – not surprisingly – been giving their reactions to the result of US election. The other contributors are US citizens, so my perspective is different. No call for introspection or soul-searching. Certainly no cri de coeur. If I say, “He’s not my President,” it’s just a simple statement of fact. Moreover […]

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Anger is my Meat

by David Ottlinger I am writing on November 9th. Yesterday, I woke up genuinely happy. Early in the morning, I posted the Doors’ song “The End” on Facebook as a little joke. Come what may, we had reached it. This was the end, and I was happy to be there. My choice was more appropriate than I knew.  The song […]

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American Foreign Policy in a Changing World

by Mark English I have previously drawn attention to the neo-conservative elements of Hillary Clinton’s foreign policy orientation and spoken of the dangers (as I see them) of a resurgence of such policies. [1] At the time I wrote my previous piece on this topic (before the first TV debate), the polls were narrowing and the trend favored Trump. Subsequently, […]

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Vicarious Grief

by Daniel Tippens A few months after my dad’s death in March 2011, I stood on the porch outside of my family home in Maryland. The sun had just risen, and I looked up and took in the scene: an acre of glistening green grass bordered by a thin lining of pine trees, their branches reaching downward to touch the […]

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Disability, Well-Being, and Intuition

By Daniel Tippens In 2014, Elizabeth Barnes published a paper in Ethics with the title “Valuing Disability, Causing Disability.” Barnes is disabled herself and observes that there seems to be a striking difference between philosophers and disabled individuals, when it comes to their intuitions about the well-being of disabled people. Philosophers tend to hold what she calls the “bad-difference” view: […]

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