Value and Objectivity

by Daniel A. Kaufman ____ Recent exchanges with Robert Gressis and Spencer Case have led me to think a lot about obligation and objectivity.  My focus thus far has been on the question of force, and my main goal has been to show that accounting for it is not made easier – or facilitated in any way, really – by […]

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The Logic of “Jewish” Philosophy (more by way of a response to Robert Gressis)

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ For those readers who recognized that beneath my humorous essay on “Jewish” Philosophy was a serious point regarding our attitudes not just towards the professional discipline of philosophy but the subject itself, I want to add a substantial postscript. It is inspired, in part, by Robert Gressis’s reply to my piece, which I quote in […]

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What are we? Chopped Liver? A Reply to Robert Gressis

by Daniel A. Kaufman ____ According to Robert Gressis’s most recent essay, a “Protestant” philosopher is one who thinks that professional philosophy today is crap, while a “Catholic” philosopher is one who think it’s terrific. He alleges that the balance within the discipline is somewhere around 80% (Protestant) 20% (Catholic). By my calculations this adds up to 100%, and I […]

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Postmodernism as Truth in Advertising

by Kevin Currie-Knight __ Does postmodernism spell the death of reason? If you have been caught up in some recent online discussions of it, you’d think so. Postmodernism, its critics (often of the so-called Intellectual Dark Web) say, poses an existential threat to reason, a bedrock value of “the West.” An article on how French postmodernist intellectuals “ruined the West,” […]

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How To Write Like an Analytic Philosopher

by Paul Austin Murphy ___ There certainly is a specific prose style when it comes to much analytic philosophy. Of course there’s a general academic prose style (or prose styles) too. The analytic philosophy prose style can therefore be taken to be a variation on that. Academics will of course say – and justifiably so – that this style is […]

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Liberalism and Kitsch

by Daniel A. Kaufman ____ On a number of occasions, I have defended what I’ve been calling “procedural liberalism” on the grounds that in large pluralistic societies (a) one cannot expect one’s fellow citizens to share a common, substantive conception of the good, and (b) one cannot expect that one’s “community,” in the sense of the word that implies a […]

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On the Axiological Cogito: Chapter One of Raymond Ruyer’s, Neofinalism

by David L. Duffy _____ Raymond Ruyer (1902-1987), le Sage de Nancy, significantly influenced French philosophy (he is quoted by Merleau-Ponty, Canguilhem, Deleuze and the enactivists, e.g. Varela and Weber), but was little referenced in English until recently. [1] His thinking has roots in Bergson and Whitehead, with Deleuze calling him “the latest of Leibniz’s great disciples.” [2] His Néofinalisme […]

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The English Revolution and the Genesis of Modernity

by E. John Winner ____ This is first of two essays, concerning the events of the English Revolution of the 17th century.  Why should these events concern an audience primarily interested in philosophy and philosophy’s concrete relations with contemporary culture and politics?  The immediate answer to this is quite easily pronounced in two names: Hobbes and Locke.  We should all […]

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