Political Narratives

by Mark English Unless we postulate an all-seeing, all-judging God, there is no one true narrative about any person or sequence of social events we care to specify. For each case, there are countless possible narratives or variations of narratives which could be seen to fit the facts. Much of the variation is value-framework related. Different assumptions regarding moral priorities […]

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Sex and Sports

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ The politics swirling around the question of gender identity are developing so quickly and furiously both in the US and the UK that it is difficult to keep track, but my interest here is the current brouhaha over Rachel McKinnon’s gold medal win in the UCI Masters Track World Championship and the questions it raises […]

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The Value of Intellectual Safe Spaces

by Bharath Vallabha In September 2016 Richard Swinburne gave a keynote address to The Society of Christian philosophers. The text of his talk is here, which is linked to in a post at the Daily Nous. The part of the talk which caused a firestorm is on pages 11-13 (starting at the end of 11), where Swinburne claims: “Having homosexual […]

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Time for a Change?

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ Over at Leiter Reports, probably the most well-read philosophy-insider’s blog, Brian Leiter has run a two-day poll, in which he asked the following question: Would you leave the APA [American Philosophical Association] and join a new dues-charging professional philosophy association that does much of what the APA does, but without the current political agendas/projects? The […]

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Experiencing Nature, Naturally Experienced

by E. John Winner 1. John Dewey was one of America’s most important philosophers.  He’ll be better remembered in the future than he is today.  With philosophers on both sides of the Atlantic fascinated with the ambiguities of language and otherwise unsure of what they are expected to explain – is that science or ethics or good taste? –  Dewey’s […]

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America and the Enlightenment Philosophers

by Bharath Vallabha Context is a funny thing. In an academic context – of philosophy courses and institutional structures – for a long time, my gut reaction to the great Enlightenment thinkers like Locke, Hume and Kant used to be: “Oh, not just more of this again. Their views, marred by racism, exhibit a false sense of universalism, and we […]

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Just Stop It

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ To my fellow professional academics (and especially philosophers): Just stop it, ok?  Stop it! What am I talking about?  Our current penchant for attacking our colleagues personally and professionally, when they disagree with us on moral and political subjects that we care strongly about; our pursuing such attacks so as to silence these colleagues, rather […]

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More on Russell and Lawrence

by Mark English In his autobiography, Bertrand Russell wrote of the “devastating effect” certain criticisms which D.H. Lawrence once made of his social and political views had on him. These events occurred in 1915. “I was inclined to believe that he had some insight denied to me,” Russell wrote, “and when he said that my pacifism was rooted in blood-lust […]

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Bring Back the Slide Rule

by C.J. Uberroth ___ In teaching high school mathematics for the last seven years, I’ve begun to realize that there are some issues in our field that seem ubiquitous. The first is the death of estimation. Students faced with a simple arithmetic problem will sooner jump to their phone for the answer than think about what answer they should obtain. […]

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