Citation Needed

by Robert Gressis ____ A number of philosophers have claimed that philosophy papers typically have too few citations. If you don’t believe me, do a Google search. Why should philosophers want their papers to have more citations than they do? I can think of six reasons: Having a Conversation: if people reading your paper want to know what you’re responding […]

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The Problem of Guilt

by Daniel Tippens  (Note from the editor: This essay is being cross-published on the author’s blog The Related Public)  The problem of evil aims to show that the properties of the Judeo-Christian God are incompatible with the existence of evil. Broadly, the idea goes something like this. God is Omniscient (all-knowing) God is Omnipotent (all-powerful) God is Omnibenevolent (all-good) Evil […]

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Larousse Concise Woke-English/English-Woke Dictionary

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ Every culture and sub-culture develops and employs its own distinctive terminology and sometimes even its own language. At times, these linguistic innovations may be difficult to understand, especially in the absence of competent bilinguals. Perhaps one of the best contemporary examples of such a language is that of the Woke (WL).  While WL’s semantic and […]

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Raging Pain as Musical Comic Book: Ramones

by E. John Winner 1. Popular music has become a swamp, with sinkholes and tangled underbrush. Every musical form can now be considered a “niche” music – not a shading along a spectrum, but a patch in a crazy quilt of vaguely related or wholly unrelated sound and lyrical stylings. Strangely, it was once possible to imagine a single history […]

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Summer of 2020

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ I cannot recall a time which sent my mind swimming like this one.  Nor can I remember a series of events that have provoked such strong thoughts and feelings as those I have been experiencing of late. Indeed, I cannot recall a summer this tense since the notorious Summer of 1977 – the “Summer of […]

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Morality and the Social World: Objectivity, Realism, and Normativity

by Jared Yarsevich ___ Moral realism occupies a precarious position in contemporary philosophy. It carries the notable distinction of drawing the opprobrium of both hard-nose naturalists and libertine relativists. Uniting erstwhile enemies such as these is quite the feat and is undoubtedly symptomatic of deep conceptual flaws. But then again, maybe the multi-front assaults indicate an inner strength that merits […]

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More Thoughts on Knowledge and Higher Education

by Mark English Last month I wrote a short piece on what I see as a rapidly developing crisis in the education sector and beyond. Open-ended and exploratory, my observations were part of an ongoing attempt to articulate and defend a basically knowledge-centred view of learning and culture. I referred briefly to the arts, but not specifically to arts education. […]

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