A Defense of Knowing Nothing

by Robert Gressis ___ Introduction In this essay, I argue against the idea that in order to count as knowing some proposition P, P should be true, you have to believe P, and you should have some justification for believing P. I have several arguments for this view, but honestly, I don’t need any because I know things and I […]

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Free Philosophy!

by Daniel A. Kaufman The novel coronavirus has caused my university to shift to all-online instruction.  Consequently, I have been posting video lectures (in lieu of in-class lectures) on my YouTube Channel, in dedicated playlists.  For those who are interested, here are the links to these playlists, to which content will be added regularly through the end of the semester […]

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Coronavirus Musings

by Daniel A. Kaufman ____ [1]  Using online communications platforms as a replacement for in-person, physical socializing had already done enormous damage to human relationships – and especially those of young people – well before the social distancing mandates required to combat the novel coronavirus were imposed.  I am worried that this collective social ineptitude will metastasize in light of […]

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Course Notes: Arthur Danto on “Surface” and “Deep” Interpretation

by Daniel A. Kaufman ___ Before the coronavirus turned everything upside-down, the students in my upper-division Aesthetics course and I were working through Arthur Danto’s theory of interpretation, so as eventually to bring it into tension with Susan Sontag’s take in her famous essay, “Against Interpretation,” on which I wrote in the early days of EA’s founding. Prior to our […]

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Endgame

by Mark English The foreign, defense and trade policies of the United States and the overt and covert operations designed to implement and support them have, over the last 80 years or so, had profound effects on the world. I used to think those effects were positive on the whole. Like so many other foreign consumers of American popular culture, […]

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Value and Objectivity

by Daniel A. Kaufman ____ Recent exchanges with Robert Gressis and Spencer Case have led me to think a lot about obligation and objectivity.  My focus thus far has been on the question of force, and my main goal has been to show that accounting for it is not made easier – or facilitated in any way, really – by […]

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Politics as Religion

by Mark English In a recent piece, I referred to a dispute between Hannah Arendt and Jules Monnerot that brought into sharp relief some perennially important – and contentious – questions about the nature of politics and political commitment. In the late 1940’s, Monnerot had written a book which characterized communism as a secular religion, and in quite negative terms. […]

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The Redundancy of Batman the Movie

by E. John Winner There have been now several efforts to realize a cinema narrative with living actors in performance, concerning the comic book hero Batman. The first, in the 1940’s, developed as a serial or series of interconnected narrative episodes released to theaters weekly. There was a highly respected, well-budgeted feature length film in the 1980’s, directed by the […]

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