New York Diary

Being the experiences and adventures of a young, single, appallingly poor, surprisingly clean, twenty-something magazine proprietor and philosopher in Gotham. by Daniel Tippens January, 2012 — Arrival — Defrauders and Dope Fiends As I got off the bus, I took note of the smell in the cold Manhattan air, an amalgam of kebabs, marijuana, and exhaust. I took out my phone […]

Read More →

New York Diary

The Editors of the Electric Agora are proud to announce the launch of a brand new feature, New York Diary, in which Dan Tippens reports on the experiences and adventures of a young, single, appallingly poor, surprisingly clean, twenty-something magazine proprietor and philosopher in Gotham.

Read More →

Wittgenstein’s Antics

by Mark English Ludwig Wittgenstein was – and remains – not just a well-known thinker but an intellectual celebrity. He generated far more than his fair share of personal speculation and gossip as well as serious scholarly attention. I’m not claiming that he was an attention-seeker in a simple or crass sense. It’s undeniable, however, that his eccentric ways, his […]

Read More →

A New Liberalism

By David Ottlinger Nathan Heller of the New Yorker recently made a substantial contribution to the contemporary debate over campus life. [1] Most of the article consisted of a report on the university and politics, and as someone who has been watching recent events at America’s college campuses, I appreciated all the new information. In addition to the reporting, Heller […]

Read More →

Isn’t it About Time?

by Dwayne Holmes The year is 2016, and Evo Morales wants to alter time to free the people of Bolivia. Well, sort of… In any case, I like what he’s up to and want a piece of that action. Of course, if this is going to be a story of altered timelines, I should probably pick a better place to […]

Read More →

Time Capsule

by Mark English Academics and other intellectuals have always played a role in public life, and one of their most important roles has been to speak out and to engage – through newspapers and the electronic media, for example – with a wider audience. But, over the last half-century or more, I think there has been a subtle shift in […]

Read More →

On Moralizing

By Dan Tippens Should we ever moralize to others? An interesting question, if you consider how many people seem to think so. Indeed, beyond the question of whether this sort of behavior is permissible in some way, people increasingly speak as if it is their duty to tell others what they ought to do. This is evident from the fact […]

Read More →